Full Service: Lauderdale Residence

  1. The Finished Project! Lauderdale Residence: Landscape installation and maintenance by PALM
  2. Before: Front View.
  3. After: Front View.
  4. Before: Front bed. Before: Front bed. Lauderdale Residence: Landscape installation and maintenance by PALM
  5. After: Front bed.
  6. Before: West View.
  7. Before: East View.
  8. After: East View.
  9. Before: Driveway.
  10. After: Driveway.

Landscaping to do list: September

Bougainvillea

Cut back for more flowers!

 

September is upon us and, as the weather changes across the rest of the country, South Florida will see little change in temperature and a slight increase in precipitation. So, the following are ways to prepare your landscaping for the last few days of summer:

1. Trim your trees. Technically this is something to do at the start of hurricane season, but I include it here just in case you haven’t already done it.

2. Trim back your woody plants. Your poinsettias and your bougainvilleas. Cut them back, give them a low-nitrogen fertilizer and you should see regrowth of flowering branches shortly.

3. Start your veggie planting! Now is a good time for many of the greens: spinach, broccoli, and snap peas as well as tomatoes and onions.

4. Lay mulch around any plants that are bare. Not only will it clean up your yard, but it also holds the moisture so that your plants and trees stay hydrated.

5. If you have a Christmas Cactus, start pulling back on the water. Throughout the month of September, slowly pull back on watering and in the beginning of October, the longer nights will dry it out completely, which produces new buds in time for the holiday season!

If you want more tips or have a landscaping question, please leave us a comment. If you live in a development, and wish the landscaping was better, give us a call: (954) 938-1999

5 ways to hurricane ready your yard

5 ways to prepare your yard for a hurricane // www.palmatlanticlandscape.com // #landscape

Hurricane season has been in full swing for a little while now, but as the ninth tropical depression heads our way, there is no more putting off your preparations. Here are five things you can do today to prepare your yard.

Downed tree after hurricane1. Trim your trees.

I can’t state this enough, it’s so important to prune your trees regularly. It not only promotes healthy growth, it can also protect your property, and your neighborhood from flying debris should a hurricane hit. Branches that touch or come close to power lines are especially dangerous and should be removed before the threat of a tropical depression becomes the reality of a hurricane.
Call PALM to make an appointment for tree trimming, as Certified International Arborists, we know the best way to trim the many different species of trees found in South Florida.

 

Courtesy of Flickr @BarkBud2. Remove all potential projectiles.

Birdhouses, kid’s toys, plant pots, and rocks are some ideas of projectiles. Little things like rocks can cause major damage if they break a window. Luckily most pots, toys, and things like bird houses can be left until the last minute when you can pull them inside, or even drop them in your pool during the storm. Rocks are more difficult and for this reason may not be the best choice for your landscaping, so if you’re looking for a redesign, now is the best time!
Call PALM for landscape design and installation services.

 

Courtesy of Flickr user @pyxopotamus3. Clear loose and damaged rain gutters.

Rain gutters will be put to the test during a hurricane, so you need to ensure they are clear and secure enough to withstand a deluge.

 

 

 

Storm Surge4. Understand your own storm surge risk.

Many people think they’re far enough from the beach to be safe, but you also need to consider levees, dams, and other water. Unfortunately, we are largely surrounded.

South Florida Water Management District’s site can provide you with more info.

 

 

Trees block road after storm5. Have the disaster recovery and restoration number handy.

Once the storm passes, there are often downed trees, sometimes laying in the way of you getting out. PALM is experienced in removing these trees and having the number on hand will put you at the front of the line. Keep our number handy: (954) 938-1999 and call as soon as you know you need help.

The Rugose Spiraling Whitefly (fka The Gumbo Limbo Spiraling Whitefly)

Spiraling Whitefly

Image courtesy of UF IFAS extension

Hold on to your hats Florida – we have another bug to fight: The Rugose Limbo Spiraling Whitefly!

Sadly, this is a new kind of whitefly and should not be confused with the Ficus Whitefly that has been causing havoc with ficus in South Florida. This new Spiraling Whitefly appears to be less particular, feasting on everything from palm trees to fruits. There has not been much biology collected on this little pest as it was seen for the first time in March 2009 (from gumbo limbo, hence its former name), but University of Florida’s IFAS Extension is monitoring the spread and will hopefully have more information as time goes by.

 

Identification
Larger than other whiteflies, this species is slower too. They congregate on the underside of leaves and lay eggs in spiral patterns. The whitefly leaves an “abundance of the white, waxy material covering the leaves and also excessive sooty mold. Like other similar insects, these whiteflies will produce honeydew, a sugary substance, which causes the growth of sooty mold.” (UF IFAS extension). PALM has seen this mold on palm leaves overhanging pools, and causing damage to the pool. UF mentions that it has also been seen to cause damage to cars should it fall on the roof.

Management

There are two ways to manage this pest: insecticides and biologically-based management, i.e. other bugs (parasitoid) that will attack the fly. It is important to balance both methods carefully as the parasitoid cannot attack the whitefly fast enough to save your plants, but insecticides could kill the parasitoid, which will make your life harder in the long run.

The first step is to monitor your plants. The fly will propagate quickly, so finding the symptoms before you have a full-blown infestation will help to overcome the issue. Nearby trees and plants should also be carefully assessed for damage and signs of the fly.

If you suspect the fly has found its way on to one of your plants, insecticidal soap can be enough to rid you of the fly. But you need to be sure to soak the plant well and wipe off all of the leaves. Obviously, this method is only effective before the fly has spread to more than one plant.

If you see the whitefly in more than one spot, use one of the insecticides listed below. We recommend a good dousing of the insecticide, but should you find it necessary to spray more than once, we recommend you switch to a different class of insecticide for the second spraying. Any kind of insecticide can be detrimental to your environment, as well as the environment at large, so hopefully one good spraying will be sufficient.

If you have the whitefly and can’t rid yourself of it, or don’t know where to start, you know who does? That’s right – Palm Atlantic Landscape Maintenance! Give us a call or drop us an email: (954) 938-1999 or
Admin@PalmAtlanticLandscape.com

Whitefly insecticides

Pretty Plants that will deter mosquitoes

Mosquito Season

It’s mosquito season and I for one hate rubbing DEET all over myself, not to mention my kids. And jumping in and out of the pool, the sprays can’t stay on anyway. The other common choice, Citronella in the form of candles, is a little less gruesome because it’s not all over me, but for that same reason, it’s not as effective. But there is a third solution that isn’t stinky or greasy and is even more effective because it deters the bugs for the season not just the day. What is it? Well, the best way to ramp up your repellent is to plant it, and just because the mosquitoes hate these plants, doesn’t make them repellent to humans. In fact, there are some beautiful and useful options.

Before I get into the list, it’s worth mentioning that any standing water areas (especially stagnant water, like old fountains, old planting pots, etc.) are like the Hilton of Mosquito World. Get rid of water as much as possible before starting your planting war against bugs.

For more info on catnip, visit catnipexpert.com

1. Catnip

Catnip has been found to be ten times more repellent to the bugs than DEET! The essential oil in the catnip is the same oil that attracts cats and drives them bonkers! Luckily it’s not so potent that you’ll end up with no mosquitoes, but the whole neighborhood’s cat population in your yard! To drive the cats crazy you need to smash the leaves (store bought catnip is dried leaves crushed). Strangely, catnip is a butterfly and bumble bee attractor, so you get the best of all worlds with this plant.

Catnip is good to grow in Zones 3 and 4, so for those of us in the south, catnip will only survive if we plant it in pots and keep it somewhat shaded and watered. If you are growing from seeds, keep cats away until it’s hardy enough to withstand being rubbed!

 

Rosemary from wikimedia.org

Rosemary from wikimedia.org

2. Rosemary

Rosemary can grow into massive bushes with pretty purple flowers. It’s hardy, but doesn’t like being in cold weather or inside, which makes it perfect for summer bug season. Keep it near the barbecue and it can work double duty by seasoning your meat (Lamb and rosemary skewers anyone?) and keeping you bug bite free too!

 

 

Lemon Balm - found at plantoftheweek.org

3. Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm is not quite as pretty as Rosemary (it looks kind of weedy, a little bit like mint), but it gives off a lemony scent (who’da thunk?) that is sweet and not too strong… and mosqitoes seem to hate it! There are a ton of different recipes using lemon balm so it’s just as useful as rosemary. This lavender lemonade recipe sounds so good after a day of lying in the sun or lazing by the pool.

 

Thyme - taken from home.howstuffworks.com

4. Thyme

Thyme is a Mediterranean herb, loved in Greek food and this idea alone conjurs up images of Santorini with cool breezes and tomatoes with feta cheese drenched in oil and vinegar. Nowhere in my imagining is there a mosquito biting my ankle.

Thyme does have a pretty scent which is a little stronger than the previous plants I mentioned, so you might want to use it sparingly, or plant it further away (think perimeter of your property) with the previous plants closer to your home. Yet again, thyme is a hardy plant. It likes warmer weather and full sun (all of these plants are perfect for summers, but may not last the winter in a colder climate.)

Thyme is pretty – it looks like lavender with little purple flowers.

Garlic plant. Image from thedailygreen.com

5. Garlic

Mosquitoes are vampires, vampires hate garlic therefore mosquitoes hate garlic. That’s logic right?

Garlic is not necessarily the prettiest of plants, and is probably the hardest to grow out of this list, but it has more health benefits and possibly more use than any of the others too.

 

 

It’s Spring! Here come the egg bearing bunnies!

Spring has sprung and in south Florida, it’s a joyous time of year! The weather is glorious, there’s no other word for it. Not too hot to sit outside, but hot enough to start enjoying popsicles and sand boxes! In just a few weeks, your yard could be crawling with little children searching for eggs, so we’d better take a look at what we need to do in April before those eggs are hidden! [Read more…]

Why choose indigenous plants

Many people, when deciding on plants and trees for their yard, choose those that offer to fulfill whatever needs they might have: shade or smell for example. Some might choose a bush that attracts butterflies or blooms with beautiful flowers, but often whether the plant is native to your area is overlooked.

Why is it important to choose indigenous plants?

The native acacia tortuosa

[Read more…]

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